Trade Agreements Chile

| 0

On February 5, 2019, the modernized Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement (CCFTA) came into force, which supports an open, inclusive and rules-based trading environment. The CCFTA is the cornerstone of Canada`s strong trade and investment relationship with Chile. Since its launch in 1997, the CCFTA has brought benefits to both countries. Bilateral merchandise trade has almost quadrupled since the Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement came into force, reaching $2.9 billion in 2017. At the end of 2017, the share of Canadian investment in Chile was $17.1 billion, making Chile the leading target for direct investment in South and Central America. In 2017, Canada and Chile signed amendment agreements to modernize the CCFTA and support an open, inclusive and rules-based trading environment. The ESTV also provides favorable access for U.S. service providers and guarantees for the protection of U.S. investors and U.S. copyrights, trademarks and patents registered in Chile. In addition, Chile has opened important public procurement contracts for U.S. bidders.

In 2008, Chile signed free trade agreements with Australia, Honduras and Colombia, while expanding its agreements with Peru and Cuba. If you have any questions or comments on this free trade agreement or on environmental and labour cooperation agreements, we would like to hear from you. Please contact World Affairs Canada at: Chile has signed more or less comprehensive free trade agreements with the United States, Canada, the European Union, EFTA, South Korea, Japan, Central America and Mexico. In June 2005, it reached a four-lane agreement with its Pacific neighbours Brunei, New Zealand and Singapore (P-4). In June 2006, it signed a free trade agreement with Panama. In February 2010, it signed a contract with Guatemala. The EU and Chile concluded an Association Agreement in 2002 containing a Comprehensive Free Trade Agreement (FTA) which came into force in February 2003 and covers EU-Chile trade relations. The agreement covers all major areas of trade relations, including trade in goods, trade in services and investment, public procurement, competition and intellectual property. A joint committee is set up to monitor the agreement.

It also contains dispute resolution provisions. In addition, EFTA states and Chile have concluded bilateral agricultural agreements. The chapter on trade in goods also contains provisions relating to trade assistance, such as anti-dumping measures and safeguards. The U.S.-Chile Free Trade Agreement came into force on January 1, 2004. The U.S.-Chile Free Trade Agreement eliminates tariffs and opens markets, reduces barriers to trade in services, protects intellectual property, ensures regulatory transparency, ensures non-discrimination in digital trade, requires parties to maintain competition laws that prohibit anti-competitive business practices, and requires effective labour and environmental enforcement. As of January 1, 2015, all goods from the United States will arrive in Chile duty-free. The free trade agreement includes a meeting of the trade coordinator and trade subcommittees that meet annually to verify the use of the free trade agreement and other issues related to the free trade agreement. The agreement establishes a high level of intellectual property rights protection (Article 46), covering areas such as patents, trademarks and copyrights, and, in some areas, goes beyond what is provided for in the WTO agreement on trade-related intellectual property rights (TRIPS) and other international agreements and contracts.